Sympathy Plants When Life Seems Unbearable

Sympathy plants are perfect gifts for any occasion to express our love and care. They bring comfort and hope to people who are facing tough situations, difficult times and personal problems. They make excellent presents for those who need uplifting and a solemn offering of condolences for a person or a family who is grieving. It can also be a thoughtful way to send your regards whenever you can’t make it on dates, meetings and other meet ups. In many ways, a sympathy plant can be a suitable mood changer for people who are feeling alone, lost, and for those who need uplifting because of tragedies and other similar events occurring in their lives.

Unlike birthday gift plant packages that are usually prepared to have a lavish and decorative appearance, sympathy plants are more conserved and subdued to go with the thought of the recipient. Though there could be hundreds of plants in the market that can be used as gift plants, visiting your local florist and asking what kind of gift plant will be best for your situation might be a good idea. Picking the right plant for unhappy moments needs more attention rather than choosing gift plants for birthdays, reunions, and other traditional happy occasions. Having the right knowledge of what is right and what is not for sympathy plants will give you a clear understanding of what your gift will be.

The main purpose of sending sympathy plants is to cheer someone who is special. When we can’t personally give them comfort, sympathy plants can do it for us. Giving sympathy plants is becoming increasingly popular today because of the convenience which is brought by plant ordering websites. Now, people who are planning to send plant gifts can do it anywhere, anytime as long as they have internet access. All you need is a computer, internet and your credit card or online purchasing account and your ready to make an order. All these is as easy as one, two, three and you can actually buy gift plants at the security and convenience of your home. More importantly,

How to Prevent Skin Rashes from Garden Plants

Sarah pushed the tops of her tomato plants apart again, gripping one of the random shoots that sprung off the plant with her bare hands. She pulled it off, then moved to another crowded plant top. As she discarded the removed piece of tomato plant, she noticed yet again the patch of tiny, red dots that had been growing on the back of her right hand. She continued to ignore it, finding other parts of the carefully tended tomato plant that needed removed for the good of the entire vine.

Ever since Sarah had started her garden earlier this spring, her hands had been plagued with these tiny, itchy red welts. She had been mostly ignoring them, hoping that the rashes would just go away, but as the weeks progressed and her garden grew bigger, these annoying rashes did nothing but spread and repopulate themselves. It looked as if a flea colony had taken up residence on her hands, and refused to bite her anywhere else.

Frustrated at the symptoms, Sarah stopped to scratch the unending itch on the back of her right hand before she plucked another young vine from the end of her tomato plant. She knew that these suckers, as they were called, needed to be removed while they were young in order to keep the nutrients in the main vine of the plant. This would make her tomatoes grow large. Her gardening app had taught her this much, but most of growing her first garden had been a mix of transferring knowledge from one type of plant to the other.

Now, with her young garden plants coming up in what was promising to be a harvest that even her grandmother would be proud of, Sarah wished that she had someone with experience to guide her through the little details that the apps all seemed to overlook. She lifted one of the dangling parts of her tomato plant and grabbed a bit of string from the pocket of her faded jeans. She tied this fallen branch of the tomato plant up and onto the wire rack

Weekend Warriors Top 5 Home Improvement Projects

If youre like most of us you love to watch those home improvement shows on TV, they make it look so easy to change the appearance of your home by doing some simple home improvements. And if youre like most of us and have to work Monday thru Friday any home improvement projects have to be done on the weekend. So for all you weekend warriors here are my top 5 weekend projects:

Bathroom or Kitchen facelift- Im not talking about a major remodel here just a simple facelift can totally change the look of a kitchen or bathroom. Refinishing the kitchen cabinets, new paint and wallpaper, replacing a toilet, or maybe even replacing that old bathroom or kitchen facet can greatly improve and update the look of any home.

Install new lighting- Installing new lighting can not only brighten your home but give a room a totally different look. Whether installing a light kit on a ceiling fan or replacing that old outdated fluorescent light in the kitchen with some of the new kitchen lighting on the market, installing new lighting is a weekend project thats relatively easy and comes with a big return.

Install tile- whether a kitchen floor or backsplash or new tile in the bathroom, installing ceramic tile is easier than you think and is a great weekend project for weekend warriors. Most home improvement stores have everything you need for professional looking results, one tip: Be sure to rent a tile saw, it will save you a lot of time and is well worth the cost.

Changing the color of a room- Color is in! You will be surprised how a splash of color can totally change the look of any room. Many homes have either white or off-white walls but many homeowners have found adding color to a room can brighten and warm up a room and is a great weekend home improvement project for anyone. As with any painting project the time you spend in preparing before actually painting will speak volumes as to the results.

Staining Garage Floor or Patio- This is

Plant Spirit Shamanism Pusanga an interview with perfumeros

The healing power of fragrance.

Plant spirit shamanism, perfume, aromatherapy, scent, incense, shamanism, shamans, healing, herbs, herbalism, love, pusanga, relationships, ayahuasca, magic, sorcery

Fragrance has long been associated with the arts of love. In Japan, Geisha girls priced their services according to the number of incense sticks consumed during love-making, while in Indian tantric rituals, men were anointed with sandalwood, and women with jasmine, patchouli, amber, musk, and with Saffron crushed and smeared beneath their feet. In Europe in the 17 and 1800s, the use of eau de Cologne became a widespread and fashionable trend, where the morning ritual in many homes began with its application before a suitor of either sex would call upon a lover. This blend of rosemary, neroli, bergamot and lemon was also used internally, mixed with wine, eaten on sugar lumps, even taken as an enema, to refresh the inner self and cleanse the spirit so that lovers could meet each other with a pure heart. But it is, perhaps, in Peru, that the magic of perfumed love has reached its highest skill, in the formulation of pusanga, which is often referred to as the love medicine of the Amazon, although it is far more than that. Specialists in the use of fragrance to change luck and attract good fortune are known as perfumeros. One such specialist is Artidoro. Another is Javier Aravelo, an ayahuasca shaman who also works with fragrance.

Artidoro, how did your involvement with perfumes begin? The story of my path of medicine began when I saw a brother-in-law who healed and chanted I used to watch how the curanderos worked. I loved listening to what they talked about, how they prepared their remedies, their canticos [magical chants, similar to icaros]. Then I went off on my own deep into the jungle, to know the plants little by little, to smell the leaves and roots of all the different medicines. I had no maestro to learn from so I dieted plants for a year and a half alone, and then I returned to the city. I used agua florida, timalina, camalonga, and dedicated myself

Blue Foliage Plants

Following on from last weeks article concerning silver toned foliage, this week we will be covering the colour blue, and a selection of the most effective cultivars for displaying this hue. As has been mentioned previously, it is interesting to consider the time of year that your foliage will have the greatest impact in the garden and this colour may be particularly effective in summer when it will be enhanced by the (hopefully!) blue skies we will be enjoying.

Floral and Hardys Top Five Blue Beauties:

1. Cerinthe major purpurascens

Otherwise known as Honeywort, Cerinthe major purpurascens is an upright annual flowering cultivar which can grow up to 60 centimetres tall and whose foliage will alternate between blue and turquoise throughout spring and summer. The flowers of this plant have bright purple petals, offset by a vivid yellow heart and they will also be accompanied by purple bracts growing at the base of the flowers. They are highly attractive to bees and will thrive if cutting is performed regularly. They prefer well drained soil and a sheltered position that enjoys full sun, but the Honeywort is fairly indifferent to soil structure and will perform equally well in almost any ph. level.

2. Festuca glauca Elijah Blue

Elijah Blue is a compact, clump-forming, evergreen ornamental grass, producing strikingly blue tufts of wiry foliage about 20 centimetres tall, accompanied by blue-green flowers in the summertime that, come autumn, will fade to pale brown. However, these blooms are tiny to the point of unnoticeable and so will not detract from the beauty of the foliage itself. The plant will require very little maintenance and even better is suited to the majority of environments, withstanding high levels of exposure or extremes at either end of the ph. spectrum.

3. Helictotrichon sempervirens

If you like the Festuca but need something a bit bigger, the Blue Oat Grass might be for you, as this is another dense evergreen with a tufted habit – rather like the Festuca, but taller. Its rigid, spiky leaves will grow to approximately 1.4 metres in height, in a blue or silver tone throughout all seasons. In the